Study Plan - Department of English Language & Linguistics – Al Marj

Semester 1

Course #

Course Title

Credit hours

Pre-Requisites

E101

Listening A

3

-

E102

Reading A

3

-

E105

Grammar A

3

-

AR1-7101

Arabic language I

3

-

GC-1406

Arabic and Islamic civilization

3

-

Total Credit Hours in Semester [ 15 ]

 

 

Semester 2

Course #

Course Title

Credit hours

Pre-Requisites

E103

Speaking A

3

-

E104

Writing A

3

-

GC-4101

General psychology

3

-

FR1

French I

3

-

E401

Introduction to Linguistics

3

-

Total Credit Hours in Semester [ 15 ]

 

 

Semester 3

Course #

Course Title

Credit hours

Pre-Requisites

E201

Listening B

3

E101

E202

Reading B

3

E102

E205

Grammar B

3

E105

FR2

French II

3

FR1

AR2-7102

Arabic language II

3

AR1-7101

Total Credit Hours in Semester [ 15 ]

 

 

Semester 4

Course #

Course Title

Credit hours

Pre-Requisites

E203

Speaking B

3

E103

E204

Writing B

3

E104

E501

Introduction to Applied Linguistics

3

-

E601

Introduction to Literature

3

-

E701

Introduction to Translation

3

-

Total Credit Hours in Semester [ 15 ]

 

 

Semester 5

Course #

Course Title

Credit hours

Pre-Requisites

E301

Listening C

3

E201

E302

Reading C

3

E202

E305

Grammar C

3

E205

E402

Phonetics and Phonology

3

E401

E502

1st and 2nd language acquisition

3

E501

Total Credit Hours in Semester [ 15 ]

 

 

Semester 6

Course #

Course Title

Credit hours

Pre-Requisites

E303

Speaking C

3

E203

E304

Writing C

3

E204

E503

Teaching methodology and strategies

3

E502

E602

Literary readings I

3

E601

E702

Translation theories and practice

3

E701

Total Credit Hours in Semester [ 15 ]

 

 

Semester 7

Course #

Course Title

Credit hours

Pre-Requisites

E403

Syntax and Morphology

3

E401

E504

English for specific purposes

3

E503

E603

Literary readings II

3

E602

E703

Workshops in translation

3

E702

E801

Research methodology

3

E305

Total Credit Hours in Semester [ 15 ]

 

 

Semester 8

Course #

Course Title

Credit hours

Pre-Requisites

E404

Semantics and Pragmatics

3

E401

E505

Language testing and assessment

3

E503

E506

Technology and language learning

3

E503

E802

Research project (paper)

6

E801

Total Credit Hours in Semester [ 15 ]

 

 

 

 

Courses offered in the department of English language & Linguistics – Al Marj

 

General courses

·         Arabic language I (AR1-7101) – Offered & taught by the Department of Arabic Language

·         Arabic language II (AR2-7102) - Offered & taught by the Department of Arabic Language

·         Arabic and Islamic civilization (GC-1406)-Offered & taught by the Department of History

·         General psychology (GC- 4101) - Offered & taught by the Department of Psychology     

·         French I (FR1) - Offered & taught by the Department of French Language           

·         French II (FR2) - Offered & taught by the Department of French Language

 

Basic English language skills

·         Listening A (E101)

Learners will encounter enough values of listening input that encourage them to participate in class efficiently. The majority of the listening tasks should help students utilize their listening techniques for multiple authentic everyday situations. Using different types of materials such as tapes, CDs, or video DVDs, when chosen carefully regarding length and level of difficulty, can extremely benefit the process of listening. After a good deal of exercises have been given, student will able to understand and develop a great amount of familiar words and very basic phrases, common vocabularies which can be found on radio announcement, TV shows, or products advertisements.

 

·         Listening B (E201)

Students will deal with more complex listening input. This will gear them towards understanding academic and scientific materials available. Using our laboratory with different types of materials such as tapes, CDs, or video DVDs, when chosen carefully regarding length and level of difficulty, can extremely benefit the process of listening.

 

·         Listening C (E301)

For students with advanced listening proficiency. Prerequisite skills: Ability to take comprehensive notes and advanced discrimination skills. This laboratory course emphasizes comprehensive note-taking and listening strategies. Students learn to recognize, in context, the more precise and sophisticated lecture styles used in most university classes. Emphasis is given to developing prediction strategies.

 

·         Reading A (E102)

It builds the foundational reading skills necessary to prepare for college-level reading. It also develops active reading habits that lead to comprehension and that introduce critical reading. Students read a wide variety of texts and show how the texts relate to their own lives as well as enhance their understanding of the world. This course may require use of academic support services.

 

·         Reading B (E202)

It continues to develop the reading skills necessary for college-level reading. Emphasizes the role reading plays in acquiring new information and extends literal comprehension to more complex reading tasks required for difficult texts. Students begin to read critically to determine the purpose, point of view, audience, and message conveyed by an author, to trace the development of the line of reasoning, and to identify and evaluate the rhetorical devices used to convey a point. Also includes vocabulary development and reader-response activities.

 

·         Reading C (E302)

This course introduces students to a wide variety of authentic texts from different sources including newspaper and magazine articles and extracts from the works of modern writers. Texts will also vary in length and density. Tasks are designed to include different skills reflecting the different kinds of responses to texts needed by students such as summarizing the main argument of the text, taking detailed notes, criticizing texts, comparing texts written in different registers examining the different features that make texts cohesive and coherent and responding to exam-style comprehension questions.

 

·         Speaking A (E103)

Emphasis is on development of pronunciation skills, question and answer techniques, and pattern drills. Students are given extensive practice in both guided and free conversation as a means to develop oral fluency.

 

·         Speaking B (E203)

Prerequisite skills: Ability to engage in short discussions and dialogues. Emphasis is given to improving pronunciation and intonation skills. Practice is given in oral discussions, presentations, and conversational questioning techniques.

 

 

 

·         Speaking C (E303)

Prerequisite skills: Ability to converse in extensive discussions, demonstrating advanced pronunciation and intonation skills. Practice is given to perfecting pronunciation skills and intonation patterns. Students practice giving formal and informal presentations using both prepared and extemporaneous materials. Presentations and discussions are related to students' individual areas of interest in preparation for speaking required of university students and professionals. Students also practice fielding impromptu questions, debate techniques, and interviewing techniques as means of achieving oral fluency.

           

·         Writing A (E104)

It focuses on the development of paragraph-writing skills with emphasis on topic sentences, order of arrangement, and basic styles of paragraphs. It introduces the multi-paragraph structure, enabling students to work on the creation of short essays.

 

·         Writing B (E204)

 Writing B course is designed to prepare students for advanced writing. It focuses on creating effective sentences and paragraphs within the context of writing short (250 - 350-word) essays, and on developing critical thinking skills. 

 

·         Writing C (E304)

This course provides guided experience in writing academic essays at the university level. Emphasis is placed on writing effective introductions and concluding paragraphs, developing a clearly defined thesis statement and crafting strong supporting paragraphs. The course will help the students to learn how to research, evaluate, use and cite sources and learn a variety of techniques for crafting their own writing through two principal activities: the process of their own writing and analysis of the writing of others. Students will receive instruction on summarizing, using transition signals/paragraphs, paraphrasing, using different types of quotes and correcting common sentence errors. All material is based on the writing standards established by the American Psychological Association (APA)

 

·         Grammar A (E105)

The purpose of this course is to prepare students in the English department to understand Grammar. In order for them to realize this goal, the first broad aim is to teach Grammar in a good and modern ways, that is, to enable students at this level to comprehend modern English grammar  and to understand how to practice Grammar in the speaking, writing, reading ,listening everyday English. This helps them to acquaint with the various sources of knowledge. This grammar course work and reference guide presents the most basic and essential structures of English grammar and provide opportunities for practice through extensive and varied exercises. The course introduces students to basic concepts in words and sentences, nouns and articles, pronouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs, prepositions, questions, negative and answers.

 

·         Grammar B (E205)

·          This course is designed for students who have successfully studied Grammar A. This course will explore the usage problems associated with contemporary grammar in both speech and writing. Topics will include: the structure of English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences), sentence structure problems, agreement errors, commonly confused and misused words, and spelling.

 

·         Grammar C (E305)

·          This course is intended for students with an advanced academic level of English language proficiency and will focus on specific grammar points in standard English which are often more difficult for a non-native English speaker to master. A grammar diagnostic will be given in the first class to identify areas for improvement. Instruction is at the advanced level using a variety of practice activities in all four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The course will include a quick review of some of the basic and common elements of English grammar; however, the specific emphasis and focus of instruction is on advanced grammatical concepts in English in both the written and oral forms.

 

Linguistics (E4--)

·         Introduction to Linguistics (E401)

The course introduces students to the basic concepts in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, as well as to some of the other subfields of linguistics, such as psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics and historical linguistics. Data and examples from numerous languages, particularly English and Arabic, are used to illustrate these concepts. The course helps students approach language in a scientific way.

 

·         Phonetics and Phonology (E402)

This course introduces students to the study of speech sounds and the analysis of sound systems in the world's languages. Students will develop skills in perceiving, articulating and transcribing vowel and consonant sounds using IPA symbols. They will also be introduced to syllable structures and learn to do phonemic analysis and employ distinctive features and phonological rules to the analysis of sound patterns.

           

·         Syntax and Morphology (E403)

This course is an introduction to basic concepts linguists apply to their analysis of word and sentence structure. Students will learn about morphological and syntactic diversity in the world's languages and practice morphological and syntactic analysis on different data sets. Key concepts covered include inflection and derivation, case marking, agreement and concord, morpheme classes, phrase structure, word order, grammatical functions and relationships between clauses. A range of languages will be studied and students will be encouraged to apply and evaluate theoretical concepts based on their analysis.

 

·         Semantics and Pragmatics (E404)

This course is an introduction to the study of meaning: linguistic meaning and speaker meaning. Major approaches to the study of lexical and grammatical meaning will be reviewed and the role of semantics and pragmatics in grammar examined. Students will be given plenty of practice in performing semantic analysis using a variety of frameworks such as componential analysis, prototype theory and cognitive semantics. They will also explore and apply the frameworks to the evaluation of metaphors and linguistic categorization such as noun class systems, kinship terms and colour terms across languages.

 

Applied Linguistics (E5--)

·         Introduction to Applied Linguistics (E501)

E501 is designed to provide a broadly-based introduction to applied linguistics, with special emphasis on its interdisciplinary nature, and on the use of language in context. Particular attention is paid to second language teaching, to language in its social and cultural context, and to the implications of the disciplinary features of applied linguistics. This course provides a foundation for a number of the other courses in the applied linguistics degrees, as well as a framework for linking them in a coherent whole.   

           

·         1st and 2nd language acquisition (E502)

The majority of the people in the world today have learned a second language. But unlike native language acquisition, which seems to occur naturally and uniformly, the process of second language acquisition can vary greatly across individuals, cultures and situations. This course attempts to answer why this is the case.  Why do some individuals, in some settings, at particular times, over a given period of time, learn a second language in the way that they do? And why is it some people are really good at it, some people just ok, and some not very good at all. The focus in this course will be explaining differences that we observe among second language users in how they learn the language and the degree of success. A better understanding should help us do a better job teaching and learning second languages. But that is not the main focus. Rather the focus is on explaining the WHY of second language acquisition.   

           

·         Teaching methodology and strategies (E503)

This course is designed for ESL teachers and will focus on the learning and teaching of language and literacy. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and practical teaching exercises students will explore the methodologies of teaching ESL and learn how to relate the theoretical findings to the teaching practices. Students will be encouraged to develop their own teaching materials and test them in simulated classroom situations.

                       

·         English for specific purposes (E504)

This course is designed to introduce a learning-centered approach to ESP, and the practical applications of the course design in the form of a syllabus, materials, methodology & assessment for particular professional needs. Students will learn to deal with language descriptions, and needs analysis in ESP course design. Several field trips will also be arranged to understand how English is used in social contexts.

 

·         Language testing and assessment (E505)

The course is a survey of issues in language testing and assessment, designed to introduce the student to underlying principles of language testing and assessment and to provide experience in critiquing and developing second language classroom test and assessment materials. The course includes fundamental concepts in second language testing and assessment, and a critical analysis of testing instruments and procedures for specific purposes, with particular attention to test use in educational settings.

           

·         Technology and language learning (E506)

This course aims to introduce the principles underpinning the uses of technology, especially computers and the Internet, in language teaching and learning. Most importantly, it attempts to relate these principles to practice. The course discusses the hardware and software commonly used for CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning). Relevant theories, principles and models are explored through readings, group discussion, and through CALL demonstrations and workshops. At the end of the course students should be able to use CALL software themselves, and they should have developed an appreciation of the issues involved in designing and creating their own CALL materials, evaluating software and effectively integrating the software materials into language teaching and learning programs.

 

English Literature (E6--)

·         Introduction to Literature (E601)

Introduction to English Literature examines language, ideas and political/cultural values in English literature from Anglo-Saxon times through the Renaissance and into the 1700s. Students read poetry, letters, and drama, including works by Shakespeare, Swift, and other important writers. Key motifs from the texts include history, ideology, and the evolving ideas about humanity and rise of individualism.

           

·         Literary readings I (E602)

English Literary readings I, the second course of a sequence, studies English literature from the Romantic period of the late 1700s through the Victorian era and into the 1900s. Students read poems, plays, and novels encompassing issues like civil rights, colonialism, sexuality, and political power; they study writing that celebrates new freedoms and new ways of assessing humanity, self, and the world with classic authors like Blake, Wordsworth, Tennyson, Hardy, Yeats, Wolfe, Joyce, Eliot, and others.

 

·         Literary readings II (E603)

Literary readings II studies poems, short stories, drama, and novels with the intention of probing both their literary merit and the ethical questions embedded within them. Students use literary terminology and basic principles of ethics to understand and appreciate these works.  The course emphasizes close, perceptive reading and thoughtful discussion and reflection.

 

Translation (E7--)

·         Introduction to Translation (E701)

This course is designed to improve the quality of Arabic to English and English to Arabic translation. Emphasis is on the practice of translating English to Arabic in a variety of prose styles. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate usage and understanding of the processes involved in translating. Additionally, students will be introduced to sight translation, the oral interpretation of a written text from one language to another.

 

·         Translation theories and practice (E702)

This course is designed to be an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of translation, both from Arabic into English and from English into Arabic.  Students will be introduced to various theories of translation and will learn to implement them in practice.  They will be exposed to the fundamentals of translating literary works, letters, legal documents, newspapers, commercial advertisements, etc. By the end of the course, students should be able to prepare and compare translations of literary and non-literary texts and be able to identify the merits and flaws of each translation.  They should also be able to construct a translation with an intended purpose and/or artistic effect. 

 

·         Workshops in translation (E703)

This course aims to introduce students to translation techniques through direct practice sessions and to consider what makes a good translation. Material will be selected from a wide variety of sources and will increase in difficulty as the course goes on. The emphasis will be on translation from English into Arabic. Some of the material may provide support for the Basic English language skills courses students may be taking e.g. Reading and Listening. Students will be expected to complete regular homework assignments for which grades will be given.   

 

Research (E8--)         

·         Research methodology (E801)

The course aims to introduce research methodology in language learning and teaching. It will present the basic skills needed to plan and carry out various types of undergraduate research, ranging from course papers to the graduation research paper (E802). Topics examined include the nature of research, research quality and planning, honesty and ethics in research, library and database searches, developing a research topic and literature review, preparing a research proposal, and the nature and use of argument in research. Course assessments will provide the opportunity to apply these skills in relevant research tasks.

                       

·         Research project (paper) (E802)

Students will undertake independent research work under the guidance of a supervisor. They are expected to read widely to develop an in depth understanding of a topic, and then identify research objectives, isolate new research questions, collect and analyse information or data and write up their findings as a research report. The graduation project integrates linguistics knowledge and analytical skills which the students have acquired.

 

2. English language courses for Social and humanitarian sciences & scientific departments: 

There are two basic courses offered to almost all the departments in Al Marj faculty of Arts and sciences including (Zoology, Botany, Mathematics, Statistics, Arabic Language, Human resources, Sociology, Chemistry, and Physics) these two courses should be as follows:

·         English I (General English): focusing on Basic English language skills (Receptive skills, productive skills and Grammar) as well as deferent parts of language (Nouns, Verbs, Adjectives, Adverbs, pronouns, prepositions).

·         English II (English for Specific Purposes - ESP): Topics should be related to the area of students’ major so they can benefit from using specialized terminology and cultural aspects of a specific field of study.

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